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Paul Green

Paul Green

Principal Research Scientist

Paul received the MPhys Physics degree from the University of Manchester, UK, in 1998 and the PhD degree from Imperial College London in 2003. Between 2003 and 2011, he took up a position of postdoctoral research associate at Imperial College London, where his research focused on infra-red spectroscopy of the atmosphere, water vapour and ice clouds to better understand the processes that control the energy budget of the Earth's atmosphere. Since 2011, he has held the post of Senior Research Scientist at NPL.

Paul is a Chartered Physicist, Fellow of the Royal Meteorological Society and a Member of the Institute of Physics. He has served in a number of posts on the Institute of Physics Environmental Physics Group committee since 2012.

Paul's professional experience in Earth observation science and atmospheric physics centres on the design, build and operation of Earth observation instrument from ground, aircraft and satellite platforms to better understand a wide variety of atmospheric and surface geophysical phenomena.

Current interests

Paul's research interests in the optimisation of Earth Observation dataset quality, through the development of pre-flight and in-orbit calibration and characterisation techniques for EO sensors, principally in the UV-VIS-NIR spectral domain, together with the validation of EO datasets through comparison with other satellite sensors and ground-based and airborne reference sensors. This focus is expressed across a number of key projects, including the design and building of optical ground support equipment (OGSE), the H2020 GAIA-CLIM project, to study our ability to validate satellite datasets from ground-based reference sensors through the rigorous understanding of the uncertainty quantification and propagation within this process and the development of methodologies that quantify the uncertainty in atmospheric ECV product retrievals. Paul works on the NPL-proposed TRUTHS satellite, leading the development of the on-satellite instrument suite and its in-laboratory demonstrator.

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