National Physical Laboratory


Solid State Quantum Information ProcessingSolid State Quantum Information Processing
 

Applying precision frequency metrology techniques and analysis
to our solid-state system to measure noise due to TLFs within
a variety of systems.

This area encompasses work where we use quantum mechanical effects such as entanglement and superposition to create new or improved devices for metrology, information processing, sensing and other applications. We mainly use superconducting circuits and devices, either directly as artificial qubits or in combination with 'natural' quantum systems such as ions.

The work in this area is closely affiliated with the project on quantum phase slip.

For more information about the work in this area, please contact Tobias Lindström

Current projects

The work in currently divided into two main projects:

1.  Hybrid quantum systems

Figure 1: False colour SEM micrograph showing rare-earth ions (red) implanted underneath the inductive part of a superconducting microresonator (grey).

Figure 1: False colour SEM micrograph showing rare-earth ions (red) implanted underneath the inductive part of a superconducting microresonator (grey).

 

Figure 2: Graph showing the magnetic response of a hybrid superconducing resonator-Gd ion system. The peaks corresponds to B-fields where the ions are coupling to the microresonator.

Figure 2: Graph showing the magnetic response of a hybrid superconducing resonator-Gd ion system. The peaks corresponds to B-fields where the ions are coupling to the microresonator.


Superconducting devices can be used to create complex, controllable quantum circuits. However, they suffer from some drawbacks, most notably short coherence times. Recently, there has been a lot interest in hybrid quantum systems which combines the best properties of 'artificial' quantum systems such as superconducting qubits and 'natural' quantum system such as ions or atoms.

In this project, we couple superconducting circuit elements (resonators and qubits) to ensembles of rare-earth ions that have been implanted in the substrate. The latter can be done with a high level of control. Rare-earth ions are of particular interest since they can be easily manipulated with relatively small magnetic field and also possess optical level transitions, making it possible to address them at telecom wavelengths. This opens up several new potential applications.

It is also possible to create interesting hybrid systems by combining different technologies. We are working on systems that combine superconductors with GaAs based single electron pumps. The goal is to create hybrid circuits with enhanced functionality for controlling and sensing single electrons.

People working on this project

External collaborators

Publications

  • Coupling of a locally implanted rare-earth ion ensemble to a superconducting micro-resonator
    Wisby, I., S. E. de Graaf, R. Gwilliam, A. Adamyan, S. E. Kubatkin, P. J. Meeson, A. Ya Tzalenchuk and T. Lindström
    Applied Physics Letters, 105, 10, 102601 (2014)


2.  MICROPHOTON

This is a European project funded by the EURAMET EMRP programme.

The goal of this project is to develop devices and methods that can be used to control single photon microwave radiation on a chip. At NPL, we are in particular working on developing single microwave photon sources based on superconducting qubits.

For more information, please see the official project website

People working on this project

External collaborators

  • INRIM, Italy
  • PTB, Germany
  • MIKES, Finland
  • University of Lancaster, UK
  • Royal Holloway, University of London, UK
  • Aalto University, Finland

Publications

  • Measurement and control of single-photon microwave radiation on chip
    A.J. Manninen, A. Kemppinen, E. Enrico, M. Kataoka, T. Lindström, A.B. Zorin, S.V. Lotkhov, M. Khabipov, M. Möttönen, R.E. Lake, J. Govenius, J.P. Pekola, Yu.A. Pashkin, P.J. Meeson and O.V. Astafiev
    29th Conference on Precision Electromagnetic Measurements (CPEM 2014), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 24-29 August 2014, Digest pp 324-325
    DOI: 10.1109/CPEM.2014.6898390


Previous projects

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